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Hayagriva in Yab-Yum form 4

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In Buddhism, mudras are quintessential gestures that are symbolic and empowered. The right hand stands for method, while the left hand stands for wisdom.

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Hahnemühle PhotoRag Bright White matte 310gsm paper

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In Buddhism, mudras are quintessential gestures that are symbolic and empowered. The right hand stands for method, while the left hand stands for wisdom. In the upper right corner of the thangka, an unidentified lama wearing the yellow pandita hat holds a flower in his raised left hand, with the tips of his thumb and index finger touching as his other three fingers point straight up. This sacred hand gesture is called the Vitarka Mudra, representing the teaching of Buddhist teachings. The enclosed circle formed by the fingers symbolise a cycle that is perfect without a beginning or end. His right hand, extending downwards to reach the ground, is performing the earth-touching mudra. This mudra recalls the moment when Shakyumuni, the founder of Buddhism, was battling the temptation of the celestial king Mara under the bodhi-tree. Buddha called on the goddess of the earth, Sthavara, to witness his determination and worth to achieve enlightenment.

This incredible work is by an unknown artist. It is an 18th century Thangka painting from Tibet or Mongolia named ‘Hayagriva in Yab-Yum form’.

Hayagriva is a Tantric Buddhist meditational deity that can be found in all four of the standard classifications: Kriya, Charya, Yoga and Anuttarayoga. He is associated with the Padma Buddha Family where the Buddha is Amitabha, the Lord is Avalokiteshvara and chief wrathful deity is Hayagriva. According to some traditions Hayagriva is an independent entity while in others he is the wrathful emanation of Amitabha or Avalokiteshvara.

In Hayagriva’s most basic form he is typically red in colour, with one face and two hands, peaceful or wrathful in appearance. The most important iconographic characteristic is a horse head, typically green in colour, placed above the central wrathful face. The horse image can be single or as many as three horse heads per wrathful face of Hayagriva.

The representation of yab-yum, which translates as ‘father-mother’ in the Tibetan language, is common in Tibetan Buddhist iconography.

 

Production times

  • 1-20 editions. Up to 3 weeks
  • More than 20 editions. Up to 6 weeks

Paper:

  • Hahnemühle PhotoRag Bright White matte 310gsm paper

In Buddhism, mudras are quintessential gestures that are symbolic and empowered. The right hand stands for method, while the left hand stands for wisdom. In the upper right corner of the thangka, an unidentified lama wearing the yellow pandita hat holds a flower in his raised left hand, with the tips of his thumb and index finger touching as his other three fingers point straight up. This sacred hand gesture is called the Vitarka Mudra, representing the teaching of Buddhist teachings. The enclosed circle formed by the fingers symbolise a cycle that is perfect without a beginning or end. His right hand, extending downwards to reach the ground, is performing the earth-touching mudra. This mudra recalls the moment when Shakyumuni, the founder of Buddhism, was battling the temptation of the celestial king Mara under the bodhi-tree. Buddha called on the goddess of the earth, Sthavara, to witness his determination and worth to achieve enlightenment.

This incredible work is by an unknown artist. It is an 18th century Thangka painting from Tibet or Mongolia named ‘Hayagriva in Yab-Yum form’.

Hayagriva is a Tantric Buddhist meditational deity that can be found in all four of the standard classifications: Kriya, Charya, Yoga and Anuttarayoga. He is associated with the Padma Buddha Family where the Buddha is Amitabha, the Lord is Avalokiteshvara and chief wrathful deity is Hayagriva. According to some traditions Hayagriva is an independent entity while in others he is the wrathful emanation of Amitabha or Avalokiteshvara.

In Hayagriva’s most basic form he is typically red in colour, with one face and two hands, peaceful or wrathful in appearance. The most important iconographic characteristic is a horse head, typically green in colour, placed above the central wrathful face. The horse image can be single or as many as three horse heads per wrathful face of Hayagriva.

The representation of yab-yum, which translates as ‘father-mother’ in the Tibetan language, is common in Tibetan Buddhist iconography.

 

Production times

  • 1-20 editions. Up to 3 weeks
  • More than 20 editions. Up to 6 weeks

Paper:

  • Hahnemühle PhotoRag Bright White matte 310gsm paper
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