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Hayagriva in Yab-Yum form 2

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The red and blue legs belong to Hayagriva and Vajrayogini that are in Yab-Yum position, representing the union of compassion and wisdom as a way to reach enlightenment. With their feet stretching outwards, together they step on a manifestation on Shiva, a principal deity in Hinduism symbolising egohood.

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Hahnemühle PhotoRag Bright White matte 310gsm paper

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The red and blue legs belong to Hayagriva and Vajrayogini that are in Yab-Yum position, representing the union of compassion and wisdom as a way to reach enlightenment. With their feet stretching outwards, together they step on a manifestation on Shiva, a principal deity in Hinduism symbolising egohood. As Buddhists strive to eliminate the being of self, this stance of power over the foreign deity means a conquest of egotism. Not shown in the narrative of this thangka, there are stories on Shiva being tamed and converted to Buddhism. Eventually, he was absorbed into the Tantric Buddhist system as a guarding deity of Buddha.

The pedestal that the couple stands on is a lotus throne, highlighting their divine status in the centre position of the thangka. Lotus is an essential symbol in Buddhism – Buddha compares himself to  a lotus flower, rising out of the murky water that is similar to the worldly affairs distracting human beings.

This incredible work is by an unknown artist. It is an 18th century Thangka painting from Tibet or Mongolia named ‘Hayagriva in Yab-Yum form’.

Hayagriva is a Tantric Buddhist meditational deity that can be found in all four of the standard classifications: Kriya, Charya, Yoga and Anuttarayoga. He is associated with the Padma Buddha Family where the Buddha is Amitabha, the Lord is Avalokiteshvara and chief wrathful deity is Hayagriva. According to some traditions Hayagriva is an independent entity while in others he is the wrathful emanation of Amitabha or Avalokiteshvara.

In Hayagriva’s most basic form he is typically red in colour, with one face and two hands, peaceful or wrathful in appearance. The most important iconographic characteristic is a horse head, typically green in colour, placed above the central wrathful face. The horse image can be single or as many as three horse heads per wrathful face of Hayagriva.

The representation of yab-yum, which translates as ‘father-mother’ in the Tibetan language, is common in Tibetan Buddhist iconography.

 

Production times

  • 1-20 editions. Up to 3 weeks
  • More than 20 editions. Up to 6 weeks

Paper:

  • Hahnemühle PhotoRag Bright White matte 310gsm paper

The red and blue legs belong to Hayagriva and Vajrayogini that are in Yab-Yum position, representing the union of compassion and wisdom as a way to reach enlightenment. With their feet stretching outwards, together they step on a manifestation on Shiva, a principal deity in Hinduism symbolising egohood. As Buddhists strive to eliminate the being of self, this stance of power over the foreign deity means a conquest of egotism. Not shown in the narrative of this thangka, there are stories on Shiva being tamed and converted to Buddhism. Eventually, he was absorbed into the Tantric Buddhist system as a guarding deity of Buddha.

The pedestal that the couple stands on is a lotus throne, highlighting their divine status in the centre position of the thangka. Lotus is an essential symbol in Buddhism – Buddha compares himself to  a lotus flower, rising out of the murky water that is similar to the worldly affairs distracting human beings.

This incredible work is by an unknown artist. It is an 18th century Thangka painting from Tibet or Mongolia named ‘Hayagriva in Yab-Yum form’.

Hayagriva is a Tantric Buddhist meditational deity that can be found in all four of the standard classifications: Kriya, Charya, Yoga and Anuttarayoga. He is associated with the Padma Buddha Family where the Buddha is Amitabha, the Lord is Avalokiteshvara and chief wrathful deity is Hayagriva. According to some traditions Hayagriva is an independent entity while in others he is the wrathful emanation of Amitabha or Avalokiteshvara.

In Hayagriva’s most basic form he is typically red in colour, with one face and two hands, peaceful or wrathful in appearance. The most important iconographic characteristic is a horse head, typically green in colour, placed above the central wrathful face. The horse image can be single or as many as three horse heads per wrathful face of Hayagriva.

The representation of yab-yum, which translates as ‘father-mother’ in the Tibetan language, is common in Tibetan Buddhist iconography.

 

Production times

  • 1-20 editions. Up to 3 weeks
  • More than 20 editions. Up to 6 weeks

Paper:

  • Hahnemühle PhotoRag Bright White matte 310gsm paper
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